King spooks generations

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IMAGE / Riley Paris

Stephen King's best-selling horror novels still scare audiences after decades on shelves.

As the generations passed and new authors entered the literary world, horror legend Stephen King kept frightening readers with his spooky stories.

King started writing books when he was a child, continuing this passion as an adult.

Fifty-nine of King’s novels are published. Seven of these were written under the pen name Richard Bachman.

Some nonfiction works and more than 200 short stories complete his repertoire, which includes many best-selling titles.

Freshman Ava Hoskey enjoys King’s books.

“He’s been a staple in American literature for years,” Hoskey said. “I like his horror books because, well, they’re horror books. His books are long, but they’re long for a reason. He really paints a picture with his writing.”

King published his first best seller, “Carrie,” in April 1974.

His books are long but they’re long for a reason. He really paints a picture with his writing.”

— Ava Hoskey, freshman

This book is about an unpopular girl named Carrie White who discovers she possesses telekinetic powers. She seeks revenge on people who tortured her using her newfound abilities.

Many of King’s works — including “Carrie” — are set in Maine.

In January 1977, King produced his third thrilling novel, “The Shining.” The novel follows writer Jack Torrance and his family as they occupy the Overlook Hotel during the off-season.

The novel has scared generations of adults and children.

A movie adaptation featuring Jack Nicholson in 1980 ascended the novel to legendary status as a horror classic, and it is often quoted in pop culture.

People love to see King’s work come alive.

Although many of the movie adaptations occurred decades ago, students still love the creativity in them and the chills they bring.

Thomas Danko, sophomore, said the movies bring the books alive.

“The movies aren’t as good as the books, but they do bring a special realism to the books,” Danko said.

Both the movies and the books keep their audience on the edge of their seats.

The books feature more detail than the movies, as budget and time constraints limit what production companies can do.

Ms. Cyrilla Nye loves King’s work.

“I have read all of Stephen King’s books,” Nye said. “He’s a great writer with lots of crazy stories. Some make you stay up all night until the sun rises just so you can know what happened at the end of the book. He always leave you waiting until the next book.”