‘Ill Communication’ turns 25

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‘Ill Communication’ turns 25

The Beastie Boys'

The Beastie Boys' "Ill Communication" turns 25 Friday, May 31.

IMAGE / Riley Paris

The Beastie Boys' "Ill Communication" turns 25 Friday, May 31.

IMAGE / Riley Paris

IMAGE / Riley Paris

The Beastie Boys' "Ill Communication" turns 25 Friday, May 31.

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While people grew up on the Beastie Boys in the 1980s, when the decade changed to the ’90s, the group’s music style changed along with it.

The band’s new music was a critical part of many millennials’ lives.

The Beastie Boys formed in July 1981 in New York City.

Its original members were Michael “Mike D” Diamond on vocals and drums, Adam “MCA” Yauch on vocals and bass, and Adam “Ad-Rock” Horovitz on vocals and guitar.

The Beastie Boys debut album “Licensed to Ill” was released on Nov. 15, 1986. It is considered their most popular album.

The group also released the album “Ill Communication” in May 1994 with the label Grand Royal Records.

The album drew from hip-hop, punk rock, jazz, and funk.

IMAGE / Wikimedia Commons
The Beastie Boy’s debut album, “Licensed to Ill,” led to the creation of their second album, “Ill Communication.”

Off this album, “Sabotage” is the best song. It borrowed heavily from the punk rock genre.

It’s very bass heavy and filled with screaming, which gives the song its punk rock feel.

The music video portrayed the Beastie Boys in a funny, action-packed parody of a police show.

“Sabotage” was nominated for five awards at the 1994 MTV Music Awards, including video of the year, best group video, breakthrough video, best direction, and viewers’ choice.

However, the song lost all five nominations.

Although the Beastie Boys didn’t win any of the awards, people still love the song and the album.

Mr. Shane Atkinson, drafting and design teacher, said that he loves the band and the album “Ill Communication.”

“The album mixed hip-hop, punk, jazz, and funk. I definitely heard jazz and funk, not so much the punk,” Atkinson said. “‘Ill Communication’ was neat because it was chill for the music they usually produced.”

Senior Ashley Harroun said she loves the band, despite the album not being one of her favorites.

“I love the Beastie Boys,” Harroun said. “I like that album. It’s not my favorite album they’ve released, but it has some really good songs on it. Off this album, I like the song ‘Ricky’s Theme’ because of the rhythm.”

“Ricky’s Theme” has a jazzy beat at the beginning and includes a more upbeat sound.

Their music was meant to disrupt and make people think about society and politics.”

— Mr. Any Nester, political science teacher

Mr. Andy Nester, political science teacher, has been to one of the band’s shows.

“Going to a Beastie Boys concert was like ‘No Sleep ‘Till Brooklyn.’ It was loud, fun, and crazy,” Nester said. “Their music was meant to disrupt and make people think about society and politics.”

Atkinson appreciates the band’s ability to step outside the box to produce music, especially with the album “Ill Communication.”

“This album didn’t fit into the mold that the Beasties set for their music,” Atkinson said.

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