Weezer’s ‘White Album’ rocks

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Weezer’s ‘White Album’ rocks

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Weezer may have had a fall from grace with “Raditude” in 2009, but the band has come out swinging with “Everything Will be Alright in the End” and their self-titled 2016 album, known as the “White Album.”

This pop rock album is very upbeat, yet the album retains the gritty, emotional status the band earned with albums like “Pinkerton” in 1996 and “Weezer,” their “Red Album” in 2008.

This album is almost a reboot of their previous works, and many of the tracks are spectacular.

Track one is called “California Kids.”

It starts off slowly and calmly, like most of this album, then blasts off with a catchy chorus with loud guitar and an amazing beat from drummer Pat Wilson.

Track two is “Wind in Our Sail,” a peppy tune about a man and his girlfriend facing their future.

The best part of this song is its catchy, nerdy chorus: “We got the wind in our sail, like Darwin on the Beagle, or Mendel experimenting with a pea. We got the wind in our sail, and we can do so many great things together, together.”

If you’re like me, this chorus will stay in your head for months.

I just got it out of my he…. Never mind.

The third installment of this album is the god-awful, ear-bleed generator called “Thank God for Girls.”

The song (‘(Girl We Got a) Good Thing’) is upbeat, has great guitar, and is one of my personal favorites.’”

— Connor Earegood, reporter

This song can be summed up by saying the nerdiest guy ever tried to freestyle rap about another guy’s trip with his friends.

It’s as close as the band has gotten to “Raditude” bad since “Time Flies” on their album “Hurley.”

Track four is “(Girl We Got a) Good Thing.”

The song is upbeat, has great guitar, and is one of my personal favorites, more than making up for “Thank God for Girls.”

The fifth track “Do You Wanna Get High” is loud and gritty.

The guitar sounds like a repetition of the chorus for their “Pinkerton” track “Pink Triangle.”

I’ve listened to this album many times, and this song sticks out the most.

“King of the World,” the sixth track, is their most positive track on the album.

It’s loud, emotional, and a testament to everything Weezer stands for.

It’s based around lead singer Rivers Cuomo’s wife and their relationship. The lyrics include, “If I was king of the world, you’d be my girl, you wouldn’t have to shed one single tear, unless you wanted to, ‘cause, yeah, I know what it’s like. If I was king of the world, yeah, girl, we could ride a Greyhound all the way to the Galapagos and stay for the rest of our lives.”

The seventh track is called “Summer Elaine and Drunk Dori.”

It’s sad, yet peppy, and Cuomo pushes his gift of singing to the limit.

Anyone can like this song. It is loud in spots, yet quiet in others, and it blends alt. rock and pop perfectly.

I this is one of Weezer’s best light works.

The eighth track is “L.A. Girlz.”

The lyrics have a nerdy charm, like in “Wind in Our Sail.”

Yet again, Pat Wilson plays his drums masterfully. There is not an out-of-place piece of percussion in this song.

“Jacked Up,” the ninth track, is almost like a transition from Weezer to boring soft rock.

Don’t get me wrong, soft rock can be great, as was the case with their debut album’s “Only in Dreams,” but this song is just not right for “The White Album.”

True fans will enjoy it, but others can skip this song without missing much.

The final track is “Endless Bummer.”

I don’t know if Weezer wanted to tell you what the song would sound like, but this song is an endless bummer in itself.

It is the worst possible ending to an otherwise great album.

It has its problems, but the good songs make it worth the bumpy ride.”

— Connor Earegood, reporter

I’m sure there was a b-side that could have taken this track’s spot.

It is not unpredictable though. A bad ending track is to Weezer as concussions are to football.

Overall, I give this an 8-out-of-10 rating.

It has its problems, but the good songs make it worth the bumpy ride.

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