Domestic abuse affects men, not just women

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Domestic abuse affects men, not just women

Serenity Booth

Serenity Booth

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Serenity Booth

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Everyone has heard the tragic tale of a loving couple transforming from Jekyll to Hyde.

Things seem to be just about perfect until one day things seem to change drastically.

People generally see women as the victims of abuse, but what about men?

According to The National Domestic Violence Hotline, one out of four women, and one out of seven men, ages 18 and older have experienced physical abuse from an intimate partner.

The stereotype of women always being the victim is unrealistic and leaves the battered men unable to reach out for help.

Men have emotions just like women and their emotions should not be overlooked due to their gender.

Despite the belief that men are superior to women in strength, they can still be abused physically, verbally, mentally, and sexually.

Junior Claire Oullette said toxicity in a relationship can stem from either person.

“Many men are abused both mentally and physically,” Oullette said. “Although it’s easier said than done, when in these situations people need to realize that their relationship is toxic and leave.”

If you want to recover after leaving an abusive relationship, cut the abuser out of your life completely.

Some may have to seek professional help due to mental scarring.

The abuser may attempt to come back into your life, surprising you with gifts and apologies.

Don’t fall into the trap.

Victims tend to go through this cycle often, leaving only to return.

They are likely to travel from one abusive relationship to another because that’s all they are used to.

To recognize a toxic relationship before it’s too late, you’ll need to know the factors of abuse.

Name calling, threatening, manipulation, possessiveness, and violence tend to be the most common things that occur in an abusive relationship.

For bystanders, if you see any of these things occur, try to diffuse the situation and separate the two.

No matter the gender, no one should go through the pain of an abusive relationship alone.

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