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How you use the internet may now be controlled by broadband companies

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On Thursday, Dec. 14, the Federal Communications Commission voted to approve a plan to repeal protections over net neutrality.

Over the past few weeks, attention over this issue has grown rapidly.

The FCC’s goal is to take away the government’s control of the flow and distribution of content on the internet.

Many people appear to be confused on the topic of net neutrality. In short, net neutrality can be defined as all online content should be available freely to anyone without any form of blockade or stall on specific websites, as well as special treatment to sponsored companies.

IMAGE / Megan Millinkov
Senior Rebekah Caudle does not agree with the Federal Communications Commision’s decision to allow broadband companies greater control over how people can use the internet.

However, the FCC’s move has tossed out the regulations requiring broadband providers to remain net neutral.

According to The New York Times, “The Federal Communications Commission voted on Thursday (Dec. 14) to dismantle rules regulating the businesses that connect consumers to the internet.”

With this having been passed, broadband companies can now change how the internet affects Americans’ lives.

These companies may block websites and charge higher fees for better service or for different content.

In addition, as reported by The New York Times, “The federal government will also no longer regulate high-speed internet delivery as if it were a utility, like phone service.”

Senior Rebekah Caudle is opposed to the FCC’s decision and is a proponent for net neutrality.

The internet is something that doesn’t need to be changed.”

— Rebekah Caudle, senior

“Giving power to a few men to completely dictate what happens to the internet isn’t right,” Caudle said. “It’s completely ridiculous to have people who don’t even use social media control it.”

Caudle does not think there is a need for the FCC to make the change.

“The internet is something that doesn’t need to be changed,” Caudle said.

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How you use the internet may now be controlled by broadband companies