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Culture, religion may affect Thanksgiving celebrations

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Culture, religion may affect Thanksgiving celebrations

IMAGE / Alexis Roof

IMAGE / Alexis Roof

IMAGE / Alexis Roof

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American’s cultural backgrounds and religious views may or may not affect the way they celebrate Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving was first celebrated in 1621 by the Puritans with the Wampanoag Indians to celebrate their first harvest. The feast was a way for the Puritans to thank God for helping them survive their first year in the New World.

Today, many people still thank God for their blessings during Thanksgiving, as well as thanking their family members and friends for what they have done for them throughout the year.

But not all Americans celebrate.

About 13 percent of Americans will not celebrate Thanksgiving this year.

Sophomore Saif Dawan, who follows the Islamic faith, does not celebrate Thanksgiving.

“All of the holidays like Christmas, Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Easter mean nothing at all to me,” Dawan said.

We celebrate it the same way as everyone else but just with Mexican food.”

— David Garcia, sophomore

Thanksgiving is, however, celebrated in the households of sophomore David Garcia and junior Grace Hoffman.

Garcia, who is Hispanic, said that having a different ethnic background does not always change the way a family celebrates Thanksgiving.

“We celebrate it the same way as everyone else but just with Mexican food,” Garcia said.

Even though some people who are not Christian might not celebrate Thanksgiving, others do.

Hoffman, who is Jewish, said her family only changes one thing, but it is more of a family tradition than anything else.

“Well, we eat pie first, and then after that we just do the normal stuff,” Hoffman said.

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About the Contributor
Alexis Roof, Reporter


Birthday: Aug. 30, 2001
Hobbies/Interest: I enjoy bowling, reading, hanging out with friends, and watching Netflix.
Favorite Quote: "Being...

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Culture, religion may affect Thanksgiving celebrations