An open letter to my friend who feels like life isn’t worth living: I am here for you

Jenna+Robinson
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An open letter to my friend who feels like life isn’t worth living: I am here for you

Jenna Robinson

Jenna Robinson

IMAGE / Brianna Horne

Jenna Robinson

IMAGE / Brianna Horne

IMAGE / Brianna Horne

Jenna Robinson

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I am unbelievably sad that you were hurting so much that you thought your life wasn’t worth living.

It’s easy to not pay attention to things we aren’t always around. I see you in passing, we share a smile — your smile so big it causes your eyes to wrinkle — and we continue on. But I never knew how much you were struggling. I didn’t hear the cry for help until it was too late.

Recently, depression and and suicide have become more widely discussed, yet people still turn a blind eye.

When something tragic happens it’s hard not to feel guilty. Even though I knew it wasn’t my fault I couldn’t help but fill my head full of thoughts like, “I could’ve done more,” and, “What if I could’ve prevented this?”

As a teen in high school, balancing schoolwork, extracurricular activities, and making time for friends and family is time-consuming. So when a friend is hurting, it’s easy to overlook or miss it.

It breaks my heart that I didn’t hear your cry for help. My mind is filled with “what ifs.”

I saw on your social media a post saying you were sorry for everything. This is what originally had me worried.

I messaged you several times asking if you were OK and telling you that I cared about you. After I contacted another friend to find out where you were, I received the news that you had, in fact, attempted suicide.

I went back on the social media page to show my mom. Upon going back, I discovered several other posts with messages reaching out for help.

How did I miss it? Why did so many people miss it or simply ignore it?

Suicide is often a topic discussed in hushed voices even though it has the ability to impact anyone.

Suicide should be discussed, mental illness should be discussed, and help should be provided — especially in schools.

I won’t ever be able to find the right words to say to you. I can’t say I understand what you’re going through. But no matter what, no matter how long we go without talking, no matter how far we drift apart, I am always going to be here for you. Always.

You are beautiful. You’re life is worth living. You deserve a life filled with happiness.

National Suicide Prevention Hotline: 1-800-273-8255

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